Museo Salvatore Ferragamo
Museo Salvatore FerragamoMuseo Salvatore Ferragamo
Museo Salvatore Ferragamo Museo Salvatore Ferragamo Museo Salvatore Ferragamo Museo Salvatore Ferragamo
Museo Salvatore Ferragamo
Museo Salvatore Ferragamo

Gancino

T
he Gancino is the first thing that comes to the minds of many whenever they hear the Ferragamo name. This distinctive symbol is more than just that; it has come to represent the brand, appearing on a multitude of Ferragamo accessories and articles of clothing. In Italian, the word gancino denotes a small metal clasp used to hang or hook various objects. This is how the Gancino began to be used in the Seventies as the clasp for a bag, which Fiamma, the eldest of Wanda and Salvatore Ferragamo’s six children, created for her mother.
However, an article in the German press dated 1958 shows a photograph of a bag designed by Salvatore Ferragamo with a very similar adornment. The origin of the Gancino remains a mystery.
Within the company, legend has it that the source of inspiration for its design was the wrought-iron gate to Palazzo Spini Feroni, the building that houses the Ferragamo business in Florence and dates back to medieval times. More likely, the idea came about in the Fifties for use as a distinctive symbol, when the development of Made in Italy products led to the proliferation of symbols and trademarks of all shapes and sizes. Regardless of its origin, the Gancino was increasingly used in leather accessories and shoes until its rise to fame in the Eighties, leading to the success of its balance between style and function.
Museo Salvatore Ferragamo Museo Salvatore Ferragamo Museo Salvatore Ferragamo